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Professor
MASSIMO TRIA (Tit.)
Period
First Semester 
Teaching style
Convenzionale 
Lingua Insegnamento
ITALIANO 



Informazioni aggiuntive

Course Curriculum CFU Length(h)
[32/19]  LANGUAGES AND CULTURES FOR LINGUISTIC MEDIATION [19/00 - Ord. 2011]  PERCORSO COMUNE 12 60

Objectives

After having attended the course students will have acquired quite a wide knowledge of XIX and XX century Russian society and literature, and will be able to distinguish the main literary movements which characterized the Golden Age of prose in the lands which belonged to the Russian Tsarist Empire, but also the main features of Soviet era literary culture. We will frame the above mentioned literary knowledge in a culturally specific semantic perspective, in order to give the students some analysis tools that will enable them to study and tackle nowadays Russian cultural world.
To do so, the students will be encouraged to compare and differentiate Russian trends and cultural events within the frame of a more general European context: Romantic literature, speculative fiction and short forms of realistic prose will be studied in a diachronic and (widely speaking) comparative European perspective, while Soviet era will be analyzed under a visual and realia-oriented point of view as well, without forgetting to consider the specific political implications of the totalitarian regime.
By comparing features and literatures that they already know, by widening their knowledge with further recommended similar reading and by using alternative ways of study (e. g.: film adaptations of Russian classics, visual Soviet art), the students will be encouraged to develop a certain set of skills which will enable them to gradually start an autonomous and independent way of analyzing literature.

Prerequisites

With some few exceptions regarding poetry, all texts will be in Italian, so that knowledge of Russian language is not required, but of course it would significantly help to get a better insight of the program. Russian speaking students can freely choose to read the books in their original version. Moreover, at least an overall knowledge of a couple of Western European literatures and of elementary literary analysis may represent a good starting point.

Contents

The course will be divided in TWO PARTS: XIX and XX century.

In THE FIRST PART we will focus on the analysis of short forms evolution in XIX century Russian prose:

- short stories
- tales/“povesti”
- short novels

in order to relate their history and specific features inside of a privileged comparison pattern with contemporary Western European literary movements, such as:

- speculative fiction with supernatural elements
- memorialist short tales and novels
- romantic literature and its following evolution in self-reflective, psychologic and grotesque forms.

Another privileged point of view will follow XIX century Russian prose-writers and their reflection on Russian history and its most important benchmarks: the role of noblemen and “intelligenty” on a wider European philosophical background, serfdom, Slavophiles/Westernizers contraposition, birth of terrorism, social and generational clashes.

In THE SECOND PART we will consider some cultural, socio-economic and political features of Soviet era, devoting our specific analysis to a small selection of significant novelists and poets. A particular attention will be devoted to the relations between literature and power during the totalitarian regime, but emigration and post-soviet times will be partially considered as well

Teaching Methods

Lectures in Italian language (60 hours), with particular attention devoted to the film adaptations based on the works to be read and to the cultural and visual realia of the Soviet era.

Verification of learning

The assessment consists of an oral test, which can be held both in Italian or Russian (other languages can be taken into consideration after consulting the teacher).

Texts

ALL BOOKS ARE AT THE STUDENTS’ DISPOSAL IN OUR DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES.

XIX CENTURY

REFERENCE TEXTBOOK
- Guido Carpi, Storia della letteratura russa. Da Pietro il Grande alla rivoluzione d’Ottobre, Carocci editore (pp. 242-248, 292-310, 335-342, 382-397, 419-424, 437-445, 450-458, 474-510, 533-537, 554-571).

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY LITERATURE:
[ONLY FOUR AUTHORS OUT OF THE SIX FOLLOWING]

- Aleksandr Puškin, Opere, Meridiani Mondadori: La donna di picche, La figlia del capitano, including the related introductions;

- Nikolaj Gogol’, Il cappotto (o La mantella), Il naso, in Meridiani Mondadori, including pp. XXVII-XLIV from the introduction OR Tascabili Economici Newton, including the introduction;

- Fёdor Dostoevskij, Le notti bianche, La mite, Il sogno di un uomo ridicolo, Newton Compton, including the related introductions;
Introduction by Leonid P. Grossman from: Fёdor Dostoevskij, La mite, Bompiani 1995, pp. 5-17;

- Ivan Turgenev, Diario di un uomo superfluo, Voland 2011, including the afterword Superfluità by Alessandro Niero;
Ivan Turgenev, Klara Milič, Mondadori 1995, including the introduction;

- Lev Tolstoj, I racconti di Sebastopoli, Garzanti 2016, including the preface, pp. LI-LVII;
Lev Tolstoj, La sonata a Kreutzer, from Biblioteca di Repubblica edition La sonata a Kreutzer e altri racconti, including the introduction pp. VII-XXIX;

- Anton Čechov, Reparto n. 6, Einaudi 1972, including the "Nota introduttiva" by Vittorio Strada;
Anton Čechov, La steppa (Storia di un viaggio), Quodlibet 2017, including the afterward “Pustjačok” by Fausto Malcovati;


XX CENTURY


REFERENCE TEXTBOOKS:
- Guido Carpi, Storia della letteratura russa. II. Dalla rivoluzione d’Ottobre a oggi, Carocci editore, [pp. 11-31, 89-93, 117-134, 143-148 (Bulgakov), 184-192 (Mandel’štam), 212-218 (Cvetaeva), 254-270, 291-293 (Trifonov)];

- Gian Piero Piretto, La vita privata degli oggetti sovietici, Sironi Editore, Milano 2012, introduction pp. 8-43 and four chapters at the student’s choice;
OR
- Gian Piero Piretto, Indirizzo: Unione Sovietica, Sironi Editore, Milano 2015, introduction pp. 18-68 and four chapters at the student’s choice;

- Mario Caramitti, Letteratura russa contemporanea: la scrittura come resistenza, Laterza, Roma - Bari 2010, [pp. 9-26, 43-54, 74-85 (Erofeev), 167-173, 265-282].

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY LITERATURE:
[ONLY FOUR AUTHORS OUT OF THE SIX FOLLOWING]

- Isaac Babel’, L’armata a cavallo, from the volume L’armata a cavallo, con il diario dell’autore, 1920, Marsilio 2002, including the Introduction pp. 7-19.

- Michail Bulgakov, Cuore di cane, any edition is good;
Rita Giuliani Di Meo, Michail Bulgakov, pp. 42-49.

- Aleksandr Solženicyn, Una giornata di Ivan Denisovič from the volume Una giornata di Ivan Denisovič; La casa di Matrëna; Accadde alla stazione di Kočetovka, Einaudi, Torino 2017, including introduction pp. V-XXXVIII.;

- Varlam Šalamov, Kolyma, Savelli, Roma 1978, ONLY THE SHORT STORIES AT PP. 11. 14. 30. 38. 41. 74. 121. 127. 150. 167. 181. 190. 195. 202. 208., the small dictionary of terms and the biographical notes pp. 223-239;

- Sergej Dovlatov, La valigia, ed. by Laura Salmon, Sellerio, Palermo 1999, including notes and afterward;

- Venedikt Erofeev, Mosca-Petuški poema ferroviario, Quodlibet, Macerata 2014.

FOR ALL STUDENTS
- ONLY ONE OF THE FOLLOWING POETS: Anna Achmatova, Osip Mandelštam, Marina Cvetaeva. Poems will be given by the teacher during the classes;

More Information

For further information please write to massimo.tria@unica.it.
One-to-one consultations will be held during weekly office hours. Times and other useful information are indicated on the teacher’s home page: http://people.unica.it/massimotria/.

Questionnaire and social

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