Select Academic Year:     2017/2018 2018/2019 2019/2020 2020/2021 2021/2022 2022/2023
Professor
FIORENZO IULIANO (Tit.)
Period
Second Semester 
Teaching style
Convenzionale 
Lingua Insegnamento
INGLESE 



Informazioni aggiuntive

Course Curriculum CFU Length(h)
[32/15]  MODERN EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES [15/10 - Ord. 2015]  LINGUE, LETTERATURE E CULTURE 12 60
[32/15]  MODERN EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES [15/20 - Ord. 2015]  COOPERAZIONE E MEDIAZIONE CULTURALE 6 30

Objectives

MODULE A
- Knowledge and understanding

The module will focus on the images and stereotypes of India elaborated in the literature of the 19th- and 20th- century United States.
- Applying knowledge and understanding
Students will be encouraged to analyze the texts in the syllabus, identify their formal and structural features, and critically discuss any passage.
- Making judgments
Students will be encouraged to identify and critically discuss the connections between the text in the syllabus and the historical and cultural context of the United States in the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries.
- Communication
Students will be encouraged to acquire the theoretical and methodological tools of literary criticism and textual analysis.
- Lifelong learning skills
Students will be also encouraged to critically analyze the text, and broaden up their reading of the text to other critical and historical discourses.

MODULE B
- Knowledge and understanding

The module will focus on the knowledge and appropriation of traditional Indian religious (both Hindu and Buddhist) cultures in the literature of the 19th- and 20th-century United States.
- Applying knowledge and understanding
Students will be encouraged to analyze the novels, identify their formal and structural features, and critically discuss any passage with the support of supplementary readings.
- Making judgments
Students will be encouraged to critically discuss the novels on the syllabus.
- Communication
Students will be encouraged to acquire the theoretical and methodological tools of literary criticism and textual analysis.
- Lifelong learning skills
Students will be also encouraged to critically analyze the novels, and broaden up their reading of the text in the syllabus to other critical and historical discourses.

Prerequisites

1. An upper-intermediate command of the English language is mandatory, in order to actively participate in class discussions and critically read the proposed texts.
2. A basic knowledge of the literary history of the United States, and of the methodological tools of textual analysis is also desirable.
3. A basic knowledge of the history and the philosophical and religious traditions of ancient India is desirable. Students are encouraged to take the course in Indology taught by prof. Tiziana Pontillo in the Fall semester.

Contents

MODULE A: Passages to India-1: India and the US literary imagination in the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries
The module will focus on the representation of India in U.S. literature. We will read texts in which India is portrayed as either the embodiment of an exotic and unreachable East, a land still attached to its barbaric and even cruel traditions, or a place of spiritual regeneration. We will first focus on the image of India that Transcendentalists constructed during the Nineteenth century; we will then move to India as the U.S. (countercultural) 'heterotopia', and we will finally concentrate on the perspective provided by an American Indian author.

MODULE B: Passages to India-2: Buddhism, Hinduism, and the US literary imagination in the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries.
The module will address the reception of Indian religious and philosophical culture in the culture and literature of the United States. We will read texts written over a century in which Buddhism and Hinduism are experienced as part of individual or collective transformation and regeneration, or of monstrous and dystopian (self)destruction.

Teaching Methods

Classes will be two hours each and will be taught in English. Typical classes are structured as follows:
1. introduction to the general topic
2. survey of the theoretical texts and/or historical issues that will come up during the analysis and discussion of the primary texts
3. reading of a limited number of passages from the text
4. analysis and debate of the passages read

Verification of learning

The final grade of students will be based on the following criteria:
1. attendance and participation to class activities
2. final exam
Participation to class activities will favorably contribute to the final grade. All students will have to take the final written exam, which will assess their knowledge of the texts and their capacity to critically engage the texts within a historical and literary framework. This will form the basis for evaluation and grading:
1. attendance and participation: 10%
2. knowledge of the historical and social background of each text: 25%
3. knowledge of the texts (ability to read and understand each text; ability to contextualize a given passage from the text): 35%
4. critical analysis of the texts: 30%

Texts

MODULE A
Ralph W. Emerson, “Indian Superstition” (1856)
Louisa May Alcott, The Fate of the Forrests (1865)
Walt Whitman, “A Passage to India” (1871)
Allen Ginsberg, Indian Journals (1970)
Bharati Mukherjee, Leave It to Me (1997)

Rajender Kaur and Anupama Arora, “India in the American Imaginary, 1780s–1880s”, in Anupama Arora and Rajender Kaur, eds, India in the American Imaginary, 1780s–1880s, Palgrave Macmillan, 2017(pp.37).

MODULE B
T.S. Eliot, The Dry Salvages (1941)
Jack Kerouac, The Dharma Bums (1958)
Pearl Buck, Mandala. A Novel of India (1970)
Amitav Ghosh, The Calcutta Chromosome (1995)

Kyle Garton-Gundling, “Introduction”, “Chapter 1. Beat Buddhism and American Freedom: Allen Ginsberg, Gary Snyder, Jack Kerouac, and Tom Robbins”, in Enlightened Individualism. Buddhism and Hinduism in American Literature from the Beats to the Present, The Ohio State University Press, Columbus, 2019 (pp. 1-60).
Donatella Izzo, “Il buddhismo nella letteratura degli Stati Uniti. Note di storia culturale”, in Giacomella Orofino e Francesco Sferra, a cura di, Ponti magici. Buddhismo e letteratura occidentale, Università degli Studi di Napoli “L’Orientale”- Centro di Studi sul Buddhismo, Napoli, 2009 (pp. 113-170).

We will also watch the movie Little Buddha (1993) directed by Bernardo Bertolucci.

More Information

The students who need 12 CFU will take both modules; those who only need 6 CFU will choose either Module A or Module B.

Students are asked to provide a close reading of each text, examine the significance of a texts literary conventions, and/or draw connections between a text and other texts on the syllabus. A critical response does not simply summarize the text or the lectures given in class.

Questionnaire and social

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